Click below for the timetable (pdf) for sessions in the Biodiversity Resilience Symposium.

 

 

 

Session 1: Long term studies as records of biodiversity resilience

Chair: Elizabeth Jeffers (University of Oxford)

This session will explore key questions about the resilience of populations, communities and ecosystem processes including: What processes are involved in making a population or community of organisms resilient?  How do we measure this? What data are required in order to measure it (and where do we find these data)?  The speakers will describe how long-term temporal records have provided novel answers to these pressing questions.

Session Duration: 1h.35 mins, The session opens with a 5-minute introduction, and closes with a 10-minute general discussion. Each talk is 20 minutes (including 5 minutes for questions).

Confirmed speakers:
Ben Sheldon (University of Oxford)“Adaptation, plasticity and constraints in response to changing environments
Joseph Craine (Kansas State University) – “An ecosystem approach to understanding resilience of bison in grasslands
Samuel Turvey (ZSL Institute of Zoology, London) – Mammalian vulnerability and resilience to human-caused extinction across the Holocene
Lydia Cole (University of Oxford) – “Measuring recovery rates and resilience in tropical forests with fossil pollen”

Session 2: How does genomic biodiversity contribute to ecological resilience?

Co-Chairs: Neil Davies (UC Berkeley) and Dawn Field (University of Oxford / Centre for Ecology & Hydrology)

Talks in this session will present how genetic variation contributes to the stability of ecological networks.  Speakers will consider how to coordinate research on the evolutionary potential of species and communities across the Genomic Observatories Network.  Can we predict eco-evolutionary responses to environmental change at local, regional, and global scales?  What can we do to promote resilience?

Session Duration: 1h.50 mins, Each talk is 20 minutes (including 5 minutes for questions). The session closes with a 10-minute general discussion.

Confirmed speakers:
Neil Davies (UC Berkeley) and Dawn Field (Oxford/CEH) - “Genomic Observatories Network and the genomic basis for resilience
Ehsan Dulloo (Bioversity International, Rome) – Role of genetic diversity of agrobiodiversity in building resilience for food security
Graham Stone (Institute of Evolutionary Biology, Edinburgh) – “Climate change, genomic biodiversity, and the resilience of species interactions
Jennifer Rowntree (University of Manchester) – “The value of genetic diversity in ecological communities
Ruth Gates (University of Hawaii) – “Microbial biodiversity and resilience to environmental change

Session 3: Factors influencing the resilience of populations and ecosystems to perturbation – theory and empirical evidence

Chair: Timothy Coulson (University of Oxford)

Are there are any factors that make a particular species resilient to environmental change?  There has been recent theoretical and empirical developments that suggest some populations are more resilient to perturbation than others.  Two talks will describe recent theoretical developments.  But do these developments match observations from the field?  The remaining two talks will describe some recent empirical evidence suggesting that some populations and ecosystems are better buffered against perturbation than others

Session Duration: 1h.35 mins, The session opens with a 5-minute introduction, and closes with a 10-minute general discussion. Each talk is 20 minutes (including 5 minutes for questions).

Confirmed speakers:
Jean-Michel Gaillard (University of Lyon, France) – “Birth timing in temperate mammals in the context of climate change: tracking earlier spring is not always possible”
Bob Holt (University of Florida) – “Evolutionary rescue — or not — as a dimension of ecological resilience”
Isabel Smallegange (University of Oxford) – “Correlative changes in the eco-evolutionary response to environmental change in a model organism”
Guy Woodward (Imperial College London) – “Environmental stressors in freshwater ecosystems: impacts, resilience, and recovery”

Session 4: Landscape resilience and biodiversity in Arid environments

Chair: Richard Bailey (University of Oxford)

This session investigates the relationship between Landscape stability and biodiversity, with a focus on dryland biomes – landscape stability, resilience in different landscape components, tipping points and positive feedbacks, looking to the future – climate change & population expansion, human-environment dynamics and dependencies.

Session Duration: 1h.35 mins, The session opens with a 5-minute introduction, and closes with a 10-minute general discussion. Each talk is 20 minutes (including 5 minutes for questions).

Confirmed speakers:
John Dearing (University of Southampton) – “Assessing landscape resilience through social and ecological records: the scope and challenges”
Andy Dougill (University of Leeds) – Advancing knowledge on the costs, benefits and trade-offs of land use and management in southern Africa’s range lends
Sue Hartley (University of York) – How much biodiversity do we need? The role of species identity vs species richness in ecological resilience
Niels Blaum (University of Potsdam) – “Key challenges in predicting biodiversity dynamics in drylands”

Session 5: Governing for resilience

Chair:  Kathy Willis (University of Oxford )

This session explores the policy and governance implications of the earth’s ability to handle serious disturbances, and if necessary adapt to the changes they result in. There are positive messages from recent developments, but also serious questions of conflicts and trade-offs between land uses for society and biodiversity to address.

Session Duration: 1h.35 mins, The session opens with a 5-minute introduction, and closes with a 10-minute general discussion. Each talk is 20 minutes (including 5 minutes for questions).

Confirmed speakers:
Robert May (University of Oxford) – “Resilience in a Crowded World: Good News and Bad News
Tim Benton (University of Leeds) – “Food systems, food security and resilience: opportunities and threats for biodiversity
Tim Lenton  (University of Exeter) – “Early warning methods for biosphere tipping points”
Thomas Hale (University of Oxford) – “Gridlock: Why Global Environmental Cooperation is Failing When We Need It Most”

Session 6: Policy trade-offs for biodiversity resilience

Chair: Paul Jepson (University of Oxford)

Trade-offs in policy and management are a fact of life.  The term trade-off often connotes compromise and some form of loss. But where are the positive trade-offs: the trade-offs that could enhance the resilience of biodiversity and ecosystems in the changing times ahead? This session brings together an eclectic group of progressive-thinking polic players who will present their views on policies that have the potential to promote biodiversity resilience if other actors were willing to trade-off aspects of their world-views on what biodiversity conservation is or should be.

Session Duration: 1h.35 mins, The session opens with a 5-minute introduction, and closes with a 10-minute general discussion. Each talk is 20 minutes (including 5 minutes for questions).

Confirmed speakers:
Klement Tockner (Leibniz Institute for Freshwater Ecology) - “Novel freshwater ecosystems: building biodiversity resilience in the real world of 21st century water management
Angus Middleton (The European Associations for Hunting & Conservation) – “Traditions, cultures and beliefs: hunting for biodiversity resilience in a crowded landscape
Jon Ekstrom (The Biodiversity Consultancy) – “Thorny questions for ecologists: biodiversity offsets and the concept of No Net Loss within emerging government, corporate and bank policies
Steve Jennings (Oxfam) – “Are there trade-offs between social inequality and biodiversity resilience?

Session 7: Resilience in Oceans

Co-Chairs:  Catherine Head and Michelle Taylor (University of Oxford )

Resilience in the oceans and it’s ecosystems is perhaps one of the least explored aspects of global environmental resilience. This session brings together researchers from different ecosystems (coral reefs, pelagic ocean), organisms (whales, coral, fish stocks) and geographic regions (Pacific Arctic, Antarctic) to consider examples of resilience in our oceans.

Session Duration: 1h.35 mins, The session opens with a 5-minute introduction, and closes with a 10-minute general discussion. Each talk is 20 minutes (including 5 minutes for questions).

Confirmed speakers:
Rachel Cavanagh (British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge) – “Endurance, emperors and ecosystems: understanding resilience in the Southern Ocean
Philipp Neubauer (Dragonfly Science, Wellington, New Zealand) – “The end of the line? Patterns and mechanisms of resilience in overfished stocks”
Sue Moore (NOAA/Fisheries Office of Science & Technology, Seattle) – “Marine mammals and climate change in the Pacific Arctic: impacts & resilience”

Session 8: How do we create resilient Arctic ecosystems?

Chair: Marc Macias-Fauria (University of Oxford)

The Arctic is warming at twice the global rate, due to the strong feedbacks between the atmosphere, the ocean, and the terrestrial surface, linked to the dynamics of snow and ice. The effects of these fast rates of change are compounded by the tight coupling between ecological, climatic, and social systems in this region. Moreover, fast land (and ocean) use changes constitute an additional pressure to these often fragile systems. This session will provide an integrative approach to the resilience of arctic ecosystems, focusing on the mechanisms that enable the maintenance of their functionality, as well as on the threats that current changes pose to them.

Session Duration: 1h.35 mins, The session opens with a 5-minute introduction, and closes with a 10-minute general discussion. Each talk is 20 minutes (including 5 minutes for questions).

Confirmed speakers:
Christian Brochmann (Natural History Museum, Oslo, Norway) – “‘How do arctic plants cope with climate change? Insights from modern and ancient DNA?’
Johan Olofsson (University of Umeå, Sweden) – Plant herbivore interactions in the arctic: regular cycles and abrupt state shifts
Eric Post (Penn State University, USA) -Diversity and stability in a species-poor system
Thomas Thornton (University of Oxford) – “Supporting resilient biocultural systems in a changing arctic: The North Pacific”

Session 9: What is the role of biodiversity in ecosystem function and resilience?

Chair: Nathalie Seddon (University of Oxford)

Drawing on observational and experimental field and lab studies in a range of organisms from bacteria and tropical trees to birds and mammals, this session will explore the role of biodiversity, in particular functional diversity, on ecosystem functioning and resilience, with a particular focus on understanding the balance between bottom-up versus top-down processes.

Session Duration: 1h.35 mins, The session opens with a 5-minute introduction, and closes with a 10-minute general discussion. Each talk is 20 minutes (including 5 minutes for questions).

Confirmed speakers:
Shahid Naeem (Columbia University) – Rarity, redundancy, and resilience in biodiverse ecosystems: the paradox of functional complementarity and ecosystem stability
Andy Hector (University of Oxford) – Tree biodiversity and forest resilience
Marina C. Côrtes (Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rio Claro, São Paulo, Brazil) – “Evolutionary and ecological consequences of functional extinction of frugivores”
Joe Tobias (University of Oxford) – Top-down processes and the role of vertebrate diversity in ecosystem function and resilience

Poster session

We would also like to invite people to submit abstracts for the poster sessions, for further information, please contact us. Posters will be displayed throughout the symposium. There will be a plenary session at the end of the first day where posters will be presented on the basis of one-slide-one-minute to give high visibility to the posters on display.

The abstracts of the posters to be presented are now available here (pdf).